Bolivar vs. de San Martín

Bolivar vs. de San Martín - Simon...

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Simon Bolivar and Jose de San Martin QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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Simon Bolivar’s Early Life and Inspiration for the Revolution “Simon Bolivar was one of the most powerful people in political history.” As a child, he was exposed to the Enlightened writers. At 16, he went to Spain to finish his education. He praised the French Revolution and American independence, both of which made Spanish officials nervous. After the death of his wife, he returned Europe to immerse himself in the intellectual and political world in order to avoid his grief. While in Europe, he witnessed the coronation of Napoleon as emperor on December 2, 1804. “He was appalled at what he felt was a betrayal of the principles of the Revolution, yet he saw the ability of one man to change history.” In 1805, he vowed to free Venezuela, and went home in 1807. The following year, France invaded Spain. In 1810, the city council deposed the Spanish viceroy and sent Bolivar to London to seek help from the British. He received no help, so he left and never returned to Europe.
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Start of the War/ Bolivar’s Military Start In this case, not all of the natives wanted freedom and in fact this revolution was as much a civil war as as effort to remove Spanish power. Though not a delegate, Bolivar gave his first public speech to the group, saying, "Let us lay the cornerstone of American freedom without fear. To hesitate is to perish." “The First Republic was declared July 5, Venezuela becoming the first colony anywhere in the Spanish empire to attempt to break free.” Bolivar freed his slaves and later wanted to abolish slavery. He had no formal military training and no battlefield experience, but he was made Lieutenant Colonel serving under Miranda because of his speech. He participated in his first engagement on July 19. Although he proved his worth, the rebel forces were repelled. Later, a siege forced surrender on August 19th after losses on both sides. Disagreements between Miranda and Bolivar had been hard to overcome because Bolivar wanted the execution or expulsion of counterrevolutionary conspirators and those people born in Spain.
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New Positions, Betrayal and Retreat The republicans were suffering from lack of governing experience, and the captured royal treasury was spent quickly. Also a Spanish blockade led to a worsening economic situation. On March 26, 1812, an earthquake hit the region, killing 10,000. Oddly, areas where loyalists resided were hardly affected, which led to religious hysteria.
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course HIST 123 taught by Professor Mr.shmit during the Spring '11 term at St. Vincent.

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Bolivar vs. de San Martín - Simon...

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