Slaves - Atlantic Slave Trade QuickTime and a decompressor...

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Atlantic Slave Trade QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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African Slave Trade and Slave Ships In the 14th century, the Europeans were taking slaves against their will on the basis that they were providing them with a chance to be Christian. Africans were brought to the Americas as servants and proved to be a excellent explorers. The Europeans destroyed most of indigenous population and the remaining peoples were forced to mine for resources. However, their populations eventually diminished to zero so the Europeans came up with a solution: the importation of slaves from Africa, and by 1540, an estimated 10,000 slaves a year were being brought from Africa. About 15 million Africans were transported to the Americas between 1540-1850. Ships were packed full so that the merchants could maximize profits. Slaves were chained together by their hands and feet, the slaves had little room to move, which resulted in half of the slaves dying from smallpox, dysentery, and suicide, while many others were crippled. Salves $25 in Africa and $150 in America, therefore merchants still made a fortune when 50% of slaves died, and the price went up after the slave-trade was banned. The British merchants dominated this market because they built coastal forts in Africa where they kept the captured Africans until the arrival of the slave-ships. “The merchants obtained the slaves from African chiefs by giving them goods from Europe.” Originally, slaves were only captured soldiers, but soon raiding parties were formed to obtain young Africans because of the high demand.
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17th century Europeans establish settlements in the Americas. The land started to be divided into smaller portions, which were called plantations. These plantations started in Virginia then spread to the New England colonies. Crops grown on these plantations such as tobacco, rice, sugar cane and cotton were labor intensive, which meant that male and female slaves were in the fields from sunrise to sunset and at harvest time they did an eighteen hour day. European immigrants had traveled to America so that they could own their own land, and were therefore reluctant to work for others. Convicts were sent from Britain but there had not been enough to satisfy the tremendous demand for labor, which meant that plantation owners therefore began to purchase slaves. “First, slaves came from the West Indies but by the late 18th century they came directly from Africa and busy slave-markets were established in Philadelphia, Richmond, Charleston and New Orleans.” The death-rate amongst slaves was high, and in order to replace their losses, plantation owners encouraged the slaves to have children. QuickTimeª and a
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Slaves - Atlantic Slave Trade QuickTime and a decompressor...

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