Learning from Our Writers

Learning from Our Writers - Learning from Our Writers' Words

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Learning from Our Writers' Words By Monday after break, e-mail me a sentence or short passage  from one of your writer’s essays that shows a rhetorical  strategy you think the class would benefit from learning.  We’re looking for models of sentence styles, analytical  approaches, and turns-of-phrase that can be readily adapted  to our writing as well. We’ll work with these models in class  on Tuesday. For example, when reading an essay by Wendell Berry last  week, I was impressed by his instinct to define two highly  familiar terms in his own words, so the readers would better  understand his intentions: “As I understand the term,  public  means simply all the  people, apart from any personal responsibility or belonging.  A public building, for example, is a building which everyone  may use but to which no one belongs, which belongs to  everyone but not to anyone in particular, and for which no one 
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Learning from Our Writers - Learning from Our Writers' Words

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