progression_two_2006

progression_two_2006 - Writing the Essay, Fall 2006...

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Writing the Essay, Fall 2006 Instructor: Tara Parmiter tkp201@nyu.edu Progression 2: Reckoning and Reviewing “Reckoning” is the act of considering, judging, estimating value: in Progression 2 you will reckon with a chosen Encounters essay, and over several weeks you will consider it in relation to its own logic, to other written texts, and to your own experience. This second progression still involves the work of exploration, but moves us more squarely into the territory of criticism and putting multiple texts into an intellectual conversation. After becoming intimately acquainted with your chosen essay, you will write an essay of your own that evolves from that text: your own essay will provide a rich reading, a rigorous review, of the chosen essay while it develops an idea of its own that grows out of your understanding of the text. October 5 Exercise 1 due. Read Arthur Danto “Gettysburg,” Paul Fussel “Indy,” Toni Morrison “The Site of Memory,” and Margaret Talbot “ Les Très Riches Heures de Martha Stewart” October 10 Progression One Essay Due October 12 Exercise 2 due. Reread your chosen essay along with one essay from the additional reading list. October 17 Exercise 3 due. Reread your chosen essay along with another essay from the additional reading list. October 19 Exercise 4 due. Read Mercer Street TBA and Encounters , Pat Hoy “War Elegy” October 24 Workshop 1. October 26 Workshop 2. Final essay will be due November 7.
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Exercise 1: Fascination (2-3 pages) Reading : Read Arthur Danto “Gettysburg,” Paul Fussel “Indy,” Toni Morrison “The Site of Memory,” and Margaret Talbot “ Les Très Riches Heures de Martha Stewart.” After reading all four, choose the essay that interests you the most. This essay will become your close friend and companion over the next few weeks (or perhaps your arch-nemesis, if you’re not careful), so choose wisely! Thinking: What do you consider the writer’s motive for writing this essay? Formulate the question that you believe the essay is trying to answer: write it out in your notebook and hold onto it for future use. Writing: For this exercise, approach your chosen text using Goulish’s concept of the “moment of exhilaration”: select the most fascinating aspect of your chosen essay and explain that aspect to a reader who has never read the essay . Make sure that your reader can understand your fascination and can understand what that fascination has to do with the essay’s larger concerns, or central preoccupations. However, do not use the words “fascination” or “fascinate” or any such derivatives in your response—show us why this aspect is so fascinating, don’t just say it is. Next, choose a second moment of fascination, one that is similar but different from the first. This
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progression_two_2006 - Writing the Essay, Fall 2006...

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