PGE 310 - Term Project-Solution

PGE 310 - Term Project-Solution - 1 The University of Texas...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 The University of Texas at Austin PGE 310: Formulation and Solution in Geosystems Engineering Term Project – Fall 2010 SOLUTION Partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) is a polymer that is often used in the oil industry for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Unlike most Newtonian fluids (e.g. water, most light oils), HPAM is non-Newtonian and the viscosity of the fluid decreases with applied shear rate. HPAM will be pumped through a horizontal wellbore so that it can be injected into the reservoir. Your job is to create a plot of flowrate versus pressure drop in the well, so we know the pressure loss in the well for a given flowrate. A lab engineer has taken measurements of viscosity as a function of shear rate for you and they are provided in the attachment. 1. Some polymer fluids have a viscosity ( ) that depends on shear rate ( ) a power-law relationship, at least in a given range of shear rates. 1 n m Where the constants m (units = Pa-s n ) and n (unitless) are the constants that best-fit the viscosity data. For power-law fluids you can derive an equation for flowrate (Q) as a function of pressure drop ( P ). If you have taken Transport already, you may have done this for a Newtonian fluid. For a power law fluid, the expression is: n n n P mL n R n Q 1 1 1 3 ) 2 )( 1 3 ( Where, R and L are the radian and the length of the pipe. (a) Using linear-regression, calculate m and n , for HPAM in the shear rate range (1 to 1000). You may use EXCEL if you wish, but do not use Excel curve fitting feature, but do the calculations we developed in class. you wish, but do not use Excel curve fitting feature, but do the calculations we developed in class....
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course PGE 310 taught by Professor Klaus during the Spring '06 term at University of Texas.

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PGE 310 - Term Project-Solution - 1 The University of Texas...

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