Module 5 (Lec1) - Muscle

Module 5 (Lec1) - Muscle - ImprovingMuscularStrength

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Improving Muscular Strength  Improving Muscular Strength  and Endurance and Endurance
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Outline Outline Introduction Structure of Skeletal Muscle How Skeletal Muscle Contracts Motor Neurons Actin and Myosin Types of Contractions Muscle Fiber Types Determinants of Muscular Strength Trainability of Muscle Muscular Strength and Aging
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Skeletal Muscle Skeletal Muscle Human body contains about 600 skeletal  muscles 40-50% of total body weight Functions of skeletal muscle Force production for locomotion and breathing Force production for postural support Heat production during cold stress
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Muscle Strength and  Muscle Strength and  Endurance Endurance Muscle Strength Maximum force a muscle can generate Often measured as one repetition maximum Muscle Endurance Amount of time/number of repetitions that a  muscle can maintain the same force Often measured via one minute push up or sit up  test (for examples)
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Benefits of Muscular Strength  Benefits of Muscular Strength  and Endurance and Endurance Decreased incidence of chronic  low-back pain Maintenance of strength with  increasing age (rather than loss) Decreased losses in bone density Improved ability to do  daily/household tasks Elevation in resting metabolic  rate
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Structure of Muscle Structure of Muscle Muscle, like all tissues, is made up of individual  cells These cells are also called “fibers” The fibers are connected by a tough, semi- transparent tissue called fascia The fascia around the entire muscle is called the  epi (outside/around) mysium (muscle) The epimysium at the ends of the muscle become  the tendons that attach the muscle to  bone
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Skeletal muscle structure Skeletal muscle structure Muscle fiber (cell) Fasciculus Bone Tendon Perimysium Epimysium (deep fascia) Endomysium Endomysium:   covers muscle  cell Epimysium:   covers entire  muscle Tendon –  connects muscle  to bone
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course BIO 154 taught by Professor Wilson during the Spring '11 term at N. Arizona.

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Module 5 (Lec1) - Muscle - ImprovingMuscularStrength

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