Module%201%20(Lec1)-%20Fitness,%20Health,%20and%20Wellness[1]

Module%201%20(Lec1)-%20Fitness,%20Health,%20and%20Wellness[1]

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Unformatted text preview: Bio 154 Chap 1 Health Related Concepts Health – World Health Organization “Complete physical, mental, and social wellbeing, not just the absence of disease.” being, “Wellness” – healthy living Good nutrition, regular physical activity, Good eliminating unhealthy behaviors, maintaining good emotional and spiritual health good How does physical activity and fitness relate to health? fitness Physical activity – any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expended energy Exercise – planned, regular physical activity planned, Fitness – capacity to perform activities required of an individual required Physical activity, exercise, and fitness are Physical studied in the context of health and disease studied Emotional and Environmental Well-being Spirituality How does physical activity and fitness relate to health? relate Physical Activity (regular) (Fig 1.2) Reduces Risk of Heart Disease Reduces Risk of Diabetes Fitness (Fig 1.1) Cardiovascular endurance (Chap 3) Muscular endurance (Chap 4) Muscular strength (Chap 4) Body Composition (Chap 6) Flexibility (Chap 5) Assessment (Chap 3) McArdle, Katch, and Katch, 5th ed. Cardiorespiratory Endurance Cardiorespiratory Aerobic Fitness and/or cardiorespiratory Aerobic fitness fitness Ability to perform endurance-type exercises Walking, running, swimming, biking, etc Ability of the heart to pump blood to muscles Ability and muscles ability to use oxygen once delivered delivered Miles per week Miles McArdle, Katch, and Katch, 5th ed. Muscular Fitness Muscular M. Strength – maximal ability of the muscle to generate force to M. Endurance – ability of a muscle to generate fore over and over again generate M. Fitness may improve and/or maintain: I am here to Fat-free mass and resting metabolic rate Bone mass Glucose tolerance Musculotendinous integrity Activities of daily living pump . . . You Up! Yah! Flexibility Flexibility Range of motion of a joint Determines the ability to carry out Determines activities of daily living activities Specificity Most common target areas Neck and trunk, hip, shoulder, postural Neck assessments assessments McArdle, Katch, and Katch, 5th ed. Body Composition: What does is really tell me? What The relative amounts of fat and lean The body tissue (muscle, organs, bone) found in the body found Relative percentage of body weight Relative that is fat and fat-free tissue that Related (obesity) to rates of Related hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia hyperlipidemia Criteria for Obesity Criteria “Old school” – height and Old weight charts weight “New school” (i.e. Surgeon New General)– same thing just in General)– ratio form ratio Desired - Body mass index Desired (wt/ht2) (BMI) < 25 (wt/ht (BMI) Overweight – BMI = 25 to 29 Grade 1 Obesity = BMI ≥ 30 Optimal Body Fat Ranges Males – 13 to 18% Females – 20 to 26% esity Epidemic - Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults between 1985 and 20 Concepts in Wellness Concepts Physical Health Social Health s nesSpiritual Health ell W Emotional Health Intellectual Health Summary Summary Exercise, Health, and Wellness Health Related Physical Fitness Fitness (components of fitness) Concepts in Wellness Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults between 1985 and 2000 Source of the data: Source The data shown in these maps were The collected through CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Each year, state health departments use standard procedures to collect data through a series of monthly telephone interviews with U.S. adults adults Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults Obesity* BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% –20% Source: BRFSS, CDC. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults Obesity* BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% –20% Source: BRFSS, CDC. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults Obesity* BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% –20% Source: BRFSS, CDC. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults Obesity* BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% –20% Source: BRFSS, CDC. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults Obesity* BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% –20% Source: BRFSS, CDC. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults Obesity* BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% –20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. JAMA 2001;286:10 Criteria for Obesity ...
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