Software_Development_Life_Cycle

Software_Development_Life_Cycle - Software Development Life...

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Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) O VERVIEW The six stages of the SDLC are designed to build on one another, taking the outputs from the previous stage, adding additional effort, and producing results that leverage the previous effort and are directly traceable to the previous stages. This top-down approach is intended to result in a quality product that satisfies the original intentions of the customer.
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Too many software development efforts go awry when the development team and customer personnel get caught up in the possibilities of automation. Instead of focusing on high priority features, the team can become mired in a sea of “nice to have” features that are not essential to solve the problem, but in themselves are highly attractive. This is the root cause of a large percentage of failed and/or abandoned development efforts, and is the primary reason the development team utilizes the Waterfall SDLC. P LANNING S TAGE The planning stage establishes a bird's eye view of the intended software product, and uses this to establish the basic project structure, evaluate feasibility and risks associated with the project, and describe appropriate management and technical approaches.
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The most critical section of the project plan is a listing of high-level product requirements, also referred to as goals. All of the software product requirements to be developed during the requirements definition stage flow from one or more of these goals. The minimum information for each goal consists of a title and textual description, although additional information and references to external documents may be included. The outputs of the project planning stage are the configuration management plan, the quality assurance plan, and the project plan and schedule, with a detailed listing of scheduled activities for the upcoming Requirements stage, and highlevel estimates of effort for the out stages. R EQUIREMENTS D EFINITION S TAGE The requirements gathering process takes as its input the goals identified in the high-level requirements section of the project plan. Each goal will be refined into a set of one or more requirements. These requirements define the major functions of the intended application, define operational data areas and reference data areas, and define the initial data entities. Major functions include critical processes to be managed, as well as mission critical inputs, outputs and reports. A user class hierarchy is developed and associated with these major functions, data areas, and data entities. Each of these definitions is termed a Requirement. Requirements are identified by unique requirement identifiers and, at minimum, contain a requirement title and textual description. These requirements are fully described in the primary deliverables for this stage:
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2011 for the course COMPUTERS 123 taught by Professor Rn during the Three '11 term at Melbourne Business School.

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Software_Development_Life_Cycle - Software Development Life...

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