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Week 1 Lecture 1 - Week# EllisIsland: LibertyIsland:...

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Week #1 Lecture and Reading Notes: Three major immigrant islands: Ellis Island: East Coast Near New York Liberty Island: Home of Statue of Liberty Angel Island: Near SF. Symbol of rejection into US.  Angel Island:  1910-1940: Home of many detention camps - Specifically Chinese man and Japanese women  It is unknown how many people passed through Angel Island - Estimates are as high as  ½  million, but are more realistically set at  100,000 - 60,000 were Chinese men, and 9,000 of them were barred  o 1 in 6 Chinese were denied admission into the US - 6,000 were Japanese Women, and were usually married o Some   joining   Japanese-American   husbands,   others   joining  white to gain citizenship o They spent about a week on the island until husbands came to  get them. If they weren’t verified, they were sent back. - Chinese Women often tried to enter as Wives as well o Very Few Alien Chinese women were admitted (about 60 a  year)  Other ethnicities passed through Angel Island, as shown by the style of food  prepared  -Meat and Potatoes were popular, but Chinese-American    Cooks also made more ethnic foods -Non Asians spent very little time on Angel Island.  Modern Discovery: Angel   Island   had   been   been   abandoned   by   the   INS   by   1940,   but   was  rediscovered in 1970 by Alexander Weiss. He noticed Chinese carvings on the  detention barracks.
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