Mod 3 Lec 3 - Spring 2011 Module 3 Accounting & Finance...

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David Robinson © D. Robinson, 2011 Spring 2011 Module 3 Accounting & Finance Lecture 3: Public Accounting Income Statement
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Accounting & Finance Accounting Finance Managerial Financial Auditing How investors use their money How firms raise money Three financial statements Forms of business Income St. Balance Sheet St. Cash Flows
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2 Financial Accounting I “Public” accounting Introduction to Financial Accounting Accrual accounting The risk of fraud by lying about timing Income Statement
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Why do we need “public” accountants? Who owns Starbucks? Or Cisco, or Apple?
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Public Accounting Conquers the “Adam Smith” problem: Distant investors, corporations Does most of the work of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) There’s much more to say about Auditing —we’ll come back to it
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For public companies, the accounts are, well, public!
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Public Companies have to file financial statements with the SEC Now publicly available online once filed with the SE pretty good summary on Yahoo! Finance Quarterly statements (unaudited) “10- Q” Annual statements (audited) “10-K”
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“Annual Reports” Aren’t very useful— usually a self- congratulatory “puff piece” Come out so late (6 to 9 months later) no serious investor would rely on them
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From Cash Basis to Accrual Accounting
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16 Introducing Financial Accounting In the last lecture we calculated “Break Even” and profit at our simple t-shirt business, on what accountants would call a cash basis ” . ..
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Cash basis: Making and selling one order of 24 T-shirts Suppose our selling price is $14.00 We know FC = $90, VC = $9.00 If we make and sell 24 t-shirts: Sell 24 at $14, Revenue = 24 X $14 = $ 336 Costs are $90 + (24 X $9) = ($ 306) Profit (loss) = $ 30 profit We make $30 profit on a “cash basis”
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16 Introducing Financial Accounting
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2011 for the course UGBA 10 taught by Professor Xuanmingsu during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Mod 3 Lec 3 - Spring 2011 Module 3 Accounting & Finance...

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