power-point-chapter-outlines-9

power-point-chapter-outlines-9 - social justice ü Pure...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–30. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style  4/15/11 The Magazine Industry Chapter 9
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 4/15/11 definition o Magazine o Collection of materials (stories, ads, poetry) that its editors believe will be of interest to readers
Background image of page 2
 4/15/11 1700s–1800s
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 4/15/11 US, 1700s–1800s
Background image of page 4
 4/15/11 1825–59
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Click icon to add picture  4/15/11 1825–59 ü Scientific American o (1845) ü Harper’s Monthly (1850)
Background image of page 6
Click icon to add picture  4/15/11 Women’s magazines ü Godey’s Lady’s Book (1830) ü 1850 – highest circulation in the US, ~150,000
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 4/15/11 1825–59
Background image of page 8
 4/15/11 1850s–1900s o Fundamental changes: ü Expansion of railroads – easier distribution of magazines ü Postal Act of 1879 – cut mailing costs ü Advertisement revenue – lower subscription prices
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 4/15/11 1850s–1900s ü Magazines attract national audiences ü Ladies’ Home Journal – first magazine with >1 million circulation (1901)
Background image of page 10
 4/15/11 1900–12 o Magazines joined the muckracker movement: ü Term coined by Theodore Roosevelt (1906) ü Journalists crusaded against big business, for
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 16
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 20
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 22
Background image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 24
Background image of page 25

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 26
Background image of page 27

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 28
Background image of page 29

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 30
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: social justice ü Pure Food and Drugs Act, 1906 4/15/11 1900–1920s o Main magazine focus on storytelling, humor, and information o Notable periodicals: o Ladies’ Home Journal o Saturday Evening Post o Reader’s Digest o Time 4/15/11 Second half of 20th century 4/15/11 Modern magazine industry 4/15/11 Modern magazine industry 4/15/11 Financing 4/15/11 Financing 4/15/11 Financing 4/15/11 Financing 4/15/11 production 4/15/11 production 4/15/11 production o A magazine needs to develop a brand with which readers can identify 4/15/11 production 4/15/11 distribution 4/15/11 distribution 4/15/11 distribution challenges 4/15/11 distribution challenges 4/15/11 distribution challenges 4/15/11 exhibition 4/15/11 media literacy ü Impact of conglomeration – benefits rich firms ü Advertisers’ influence on content, since magazines are mostly supported by advertising revenue – ways to limit influence?...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/14/2011 for the course ADVERTISIN 1101 taught by Professor Dr.jamesl.marra during the Fall '11 term at Temple.

Page1 / 30

power-point-chapter-outlines-9 - social justice ü Pure...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 30. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online