PChem 412 CO2 Lab - Triple Point of Carbon Dioxide: Heat of...

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Triple Point of Carbon Dioxide: Heat of Sublimation Introduction In this experiment you will collect pressure and temperature data points for a sample of carbon dioxide. This data will be used to construct a portion of the phase diagram for carbon dioxide and to calculate the heat of sublimation and heat of vaporization of carbon dioxide. The phase equilibrium of carbon dioxide near its triple point (pressure and temperature where all three phases co-exist in equilibrium) will be observed. At atmospheric pressure the liquid phase of carbon dioxide is not thermodynamically stable (i.e., dry ice), and solid carbon dioxide passes directly to gas phase via sublimation. At elevated pressures, however, the liquid phase of carbon dioxide is thermodynamically stable, and one can observe the formation of a liquid carbon dioxide as the solid melts. To achieve higher pressures, we will allow a sample of carbon dioxide to sublime in a small sealed container. As gas forms, the pressure rises and eventually become large enough for liquid carbon dioxide to form. At the same time, the temperature also increases because the carbon dioxide will absorb thermal energy from the surroundings. Using a specially designed apparatus, you will perform simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements along with visual observations of the phases present. This will allow you to identify the triple point of carbon dioxide. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2011 for the course CHEM 412 taught by Professor Webb during the Spring '09 term at Western Kentucky University.

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PChem 412 CO2 Lab - Triple Point of Carbon Dioxide: Heat of...

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