Chapter 2- gsu- spring 2010- final-student version

Chapter 2- gsu- spring 2010- final-student version -...

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The First Founding:  Interests and  Conflicts The American Revolution and the American Constitution were outgrowths and expressions of a struggle among economic and political forces within the colonies.
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  Colonial American society can be broken down into five distinct elements, each having its own interests and ideas regarding independence. Colonial Interests 1. New England merchants 2. Southern planters 3. Royalists (Tories) 4. Shopkeepers, artisans, and laborers 5. Small farmers
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 Problems with Britain Stamp Act Sugar Act Boston Massacre Boston Tea Party “No taxation without representation.”
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Declaring Independence First Continental Congress Second Continental Congress In the Declaration, Thomas Jefferson asserted the “self evident” and truth of men’s “inalienable rights” to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”
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Declaration of  Independence Appendix A-1
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Jefferson and the  Declaration “Sole” originator? List of charges eliminated “He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating the most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.” Importation of slave abolishment deleted South Carolina and Georgia
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The Articles of Confederation and  Perpetual Union History Adopted 1777 Ratified 1781 America’s governing document until 1789 Content Weak central government Legislative dominance/No executive branch Execution of laws left to individual states
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2011 for the course HISTORY 1101 taught by Professor Haroldsmith during the Spring '11 term at Georgia Perimeter.

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Chapter 2- gsu- spring 2010- final-student version -...

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