chapter 3- gsu 2010 final-student version

chapter 3- gsu 2010 final-student version - I n addition to...

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In addition to questions of the structure of the national government, the balance of power between the central government and the states was at the heart of the constitutional struggle between the Federalists and the Antifederalists .
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Antifederalists and the Vice Presidency “ The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.” --Article I, Section 3, of the U. S. Constitution
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Federal systems Under the Constitution , the United States has a federal system of government in which the national government shares power with lower levels of government.
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The Federal Framework federalism: a system of government in which power is divided, by a constitution, between a central government and regional governments Governments can organize the balance of power between the central and regional governments in a variety of ways: Confederations Federal systems Unitary systems
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Unitary systems tip the balance of power in favor of a stronger central government ; in unitary systems, lower levels of government have little power independent of the central government. Confederations like the Articles of Confederation , reserve a great deal of power to lower levels of government.
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National Government Powers Expressed powers Collect taxes Coin money Declare war Regulate Commerce Implied powers The “necessary and proper” powers the national government has from their implication in the
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chapter 3- gsu 2010 final-student version - I n addition to...

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