The Dance of Evolution, or How Art Got Its Start - New York Times

The Dance of Evolution, or How Art Got Its Start - New York Times

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Travel Jobs Real Estate Autos Environment Basics The Dance of Evolution, or How Art Got Its Start Sign In to E-Mail or Save This Print Reprints Share Close Linkedin Digg Facebook Mixx MySpace Permalink By NATALIE ANGIER Published: November 27, 2007 If you have ever been to a Jewish wedding, you know that sooner or later the ominous notes of “Hava Nagila” will sound, and you will be expected to dance the hora. And if you don’t really know how to dance the hora, you will nevertheless be compelled to join hands with others, stumble around in a circle, give little kicks and pretend to enjoy yourself, all the while wondering if there’s a word in Yiddish that means “she who stares pathetically at the feet of others because she is still trying to figure out how to dance the hora.” Skip to next paragraph
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Serge Bloch Enlarge This Image Serge Bloch I am pleased and relieved to report that my flailing days are through. This month, in a freewheeling symposium at the University of Michigan on the evolutionary value of art and why we humans spend so much time at it, a number of the presenters supplemented their standard PowerPoint presentations with hands-on activities. Some members of the audience might have liked folding the origami boxes or scrawling messages on the floor, but for me the high point came when a neurobiologist taught us how to dance the hora. As we stepped together in klezmeric, well-schooled synchrony, I felt free and exhilarated. I felt competent and loved. I felt like calling my mother. I felt, it seems, just as a dancing body should. In the main presentation at the conference, Ellen Dissanayake, an independent scholar affiliated with the University of Washington , Seattle, offered her sweeping thesis of the evolution of art, nimbly blending familiar themes with the radically new. By her reckoning, the artistic impulse is a human birthright, a trait so ancient, universal and persistent that it is almost surely innate. But while some researchers have suggested that our artiness arose accidentally, as a byproduct of large brains that evolved to solve problems and were
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2011 for the course PHIL 313 taught by Professor Ericdietrich during the Spring '11 term at Binghamton University.

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The Dance of Evolution, or How Art Got Its Start - New York Times

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