AS101 Lecture 11

AS101 Lecture 11 - AS101 Lecture 11 Logistics: Homework 4...

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AS101 Lecture 11 Logistics: • Homework 4 available • Today is the last day to drop this class with a W grade Last Lecture: • Newton’s Laws of Motion • Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation Today’s Lecture: • Applications of Newton’s Laws • Weight, Orbits, Tides • Conservation of angular momentum, energy
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Unpleasant Topic Students are encouraged to collaborate with each other when solving the problem sets and/or laboratory exercises. However, each student must independently write-up the problem sets and the labs . If two assignments are overwhelmingly similar or identical, then that will be considered a form of academic misconduct . Boston University takes a very hard stand on any form of academic misconduct and is prepared to act swiftly and seriously. Accordingly, in instances where you have worked with another student on an assignment, make it painfully clear that the written solutions represent your own understanding of the problem.
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Note: All distances are measured from the Center of the Earth. So, to know how weight might be different at sea level and at the top of a mountain, you need to consider the distances from the center of the Earth. Courtesy Kaufmann & Freedman, Universe W e = G × M e × m / R e 2 Here R = R e The effect of “inverse-square law” on weight
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Alexis Cupp: If you were in an elevator which accelerates downward at ½ g = 4.9 m/s 2 , how much would you weigh (e.g., X times “normal”)? Weight is the force holding you up (eg. The scale)
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A math trick Q: How much would Tom Brady weigh on the Moon? (He weighs 225 lbs on Earth) A: Weight on Moon (W m ) = G × M m × m Tom / R m 2 But, we know, M m = 0.0123 M e and, R m = 0.27 R e So, W m / W e = (M m / M e ) × (R e 2 / R m 2 ) = 0.16 i.e., on the Moon, he would weigh 0.16
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2011 for the course ASTRO 101 taught by Professor Oppenheim during the Spring '11 term at BU.

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AS101 Lecture 11 - AS101 Lecture 11 Logistics: Homework 4...

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