AS101 Lecture 15

AS101 Lecture 15 - AS101 Lecture 15 Logistics Do the night...

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AS101 Lecture 15 Logistics: • Do the night lab as soon as you can Last Lecture: • Light and matter • Doppler Effect Today’s Lecture: • Telescopes • Spectrometer, interferometer
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Curved mirror If the mirror is a sphere: Since all rays do not converge to the same place, the image will be fuzzy. This is called spherical aberration . Sphere Range of foci
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Spherical aberration can be eliminated by using a paraboloid or a corrector plate or some other technique. Spherical aberration Courtesy Kaufmann & Freedman, Universe
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Reflecting telescope Courtesy Chaisson & McMillan, Astronomy Today
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Refraction Light rays also bend when traveling from one transparent medium to another. This is due to the difference in the speed of light in different medium. The bending is towards the normal in the denser medium and the amount of bending (which is different for different color) depends upon the density of the medium.
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Refraction Normal Normal Normal Courtesy Kaufmann & Freedman, Universe
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Lens but this creates a problem Courtesy Chaisson & McMillan, Astronomy Today
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Matt Goldberg: So what seems to be the problem? Courtesy Kaufmann & Freedman, Universe
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Chromatic Aberration Courtesy Kaufmann & Freedman, Universe
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“Real” Telescopes
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“Real” Telescopes (part deux)
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Other options
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Role of secondary The secondary mirrors in the Cassegrain and Newtonian telescopes block portion of the incident light. However, these do not result is a hole in the image of the objects collected by them Courtesy Kaufmann & Freedman, Universe
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How does Earth’s atmosphere affect ground-based observations? The best ground-based sites for astronomical observing are • Calm (not too windy) • High (less atmosphere to see through) • Dark (far from city lights) • Dry (few cloudy nights)
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Light Pollution Scattering of human-made light in the atmosphere is a growing problem for astronomy
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Pollution Tucson, 1959 Tucson, 1989
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AS101 Lecture 15 - AS101 Lecture 15 Logistics Do the night...

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