CheckPoint- Argument and Logic

CheckPoint- Argument and Logic - things such as move an...

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The excerpt Free will versus Determination explains that there is two beliefs that are truly believed however do not easily co-exist. We believe that we as humans have free will. The free will to do something as simple as move our arm simply because we want to, not because we have to. We also believe that physical law determines the behavior of atoms. The behavior of atoms meaning that whatever an atom does, it has to do it. That means that the specific motion an atom does in a specific situation determines that in that situation the atom must always make the specific motion. The excerpt argues that if you were to move your arm by choice it is at your free will and you did not have to move your arm therefore we have free will. If however an atom did the movement in the specific situation that free will does not hold true. Logically if we are able to make decisions to do
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Unformatted text preview: things such as move an arm, or to no longer smoke free will holds true. I feel that the biggest strength in the excerpt is the argument of free will, and the biggest weakness is the argument of physical law being determined by the behavior of atoms. The excerpt quotes famous physicist Arthur Eddington in his thoughts on the significance in his struggle to give up smoking. The quote makes it clear that it is a matter of free will as it is a choice you make. It makes me believe that in all situation free will wins. If a friend asks you to put your hand on their shoulder you would be doing this as free will. That would be the same as shaking someone’s hand. You would be doing this on your own free will. You don’t have to shake his or her hand therefore you are making the choice to shake someone’s hand in any situation....
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2011 for the course PHI 105 taught by Professor Taylor during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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