Lecture3-naming - BBT 4301 Distributed Systems Lecture 3...

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BBT 4301: Distributed Systems Lecture 3: Naming
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Naming Naming systems play an important role in all computer systems, and especially within a distributed environment. The three main areas of study: 1. The organisation and implementation of human- friendly naming systems. 2. Naming as it relates to mobile entities. 3. Garbage collection – what to do when a name is no longer needed. We are only going to discuss area 1. above
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Some Definitions
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Some Definitions Entity – just about any resource. Name – a string (possibly human-friendly) that refers to an entity. Address – an entity’s “access-point.” – A name for an entity that is independent of an address is referred to as “location independent”. Identifier – a reference to an entity that is unique and never reused. – By using identifiers, it is much easier to unambiguously refer to an entity – Another important type of name is a human-friendly names, represented as a character string (e.g.DNS name)
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Namespaces • Names are often organised into namespaces. • Within distributed systems, a namespace is represented by a labelled, directed graph with two types of nodes: - leaf nodes : information on an entity. - directory nodes : a collection of named outgoing edges (which can lead to any other type of node). • Each namespace has at least one root node. • Nodes can be referred to by path names (with absolute or relative). • Examples include: – File systems, Variable names, DNS, Telephone numbers, etc .
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Name Spaces and Graphs • A general naming graph with a single root node, showing relative and absolute path names.
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Other Name Space Examples • UNIX file system implementation (with NFS enhancements to support “remote mounting” of remote file systems). • SNMP MIB-II (a “sub-namespace” within a much larger namespace maintained by the ISO). • DNS
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• The process of looking up information stored in the node given just the path name.
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2011 for the course BBT 4301 taught by Professor Jigneshpatel during the Spring '11 term at Adams State University.

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Lecture3-naming - BBT 4301 Distributed Systems Lecture 3...

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