W6IntLect

W6IntLect - Memory Modules 1 DIP (Dual Inline Package) DRAM...

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1 Memory Modules
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2 DIP (Dual Inline Package) DRAM chip was common when memory was soldered directly onto the system board. The pins install into holes that extend into the surface of the circuit board. time consuming and labor intensive Dual Inline Package
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3 SIMM (Single Inline Memory Module) DRAM ‘s grouped together. called a module. Mixing prevents accurate memory count. 72 pin SIMM 30 pin SIMM 64 pin SIMM
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4 SIMM Cont. (Single Inline Memory Module) However, different speed (60ns or 70ns) within the same bank is allowed. All memory taken together will be set to the speed of the slowest SIMM. available in two physical types –30 pin (9 bit) and 72 pin (32 and 36 bit) for PC ‘s Macintosh uses 64 pin modules
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5 DIMMs
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6 RIMM Technologies Use a narrower data path than SIMMs or DIMMs for faster data transmission Data moves sequentially through each module Empty sockets must have a continuity module installed to enable continuity from the controller until termination on the motherboard.
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7 RIMM Technologies
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8 EDO (Extended Data Output) EDO memory allows a memory address to hold a piece of data for multiple reads. EDO memory doesn’t discharge a memory address until a new bit of data is written to that particular location. EDO memory is faster because of fewer wait states.
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9 What to Look for When Buying memory fastest motherboard can support Match tin leads to tin and gold leads to gold connectors Dates stamped on remanufactured and used modules should be relatively close together in lapsed time Beware re-marked chips
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10 How Much and What Kind to Buy How much do I have/need? How many slots on motherboard? What type/size does the motherboard support? How much additional is cost-effective? Match modules to the motherboard
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11 Troubleshooting Computer does not recognize new SIMMs, DIMMs, or RIMMs, or memory error messages appear system locks up or memory errors occur during normal operation, and you have not just upgraded memory illegal operations, and General Protection Faults occur during normal operation
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12 Troubleshooting hints Random inconsistent errors / performance Memory refresh rate, power glitches, incorrect type or speed, outside interference (RF, EMI or ESD) Locating a memory error or parity error message. Move modules around to detect bad unit Unable to seat module properly Improper module for slot i.e. voltage, pins, type Won’t boot Speed out of range, missing 2 nd module or continuity module. Memory check finishes to fast Check if cache memory enabled in BIOS and disable before testing memory. System locks up Slot and / or module uses incompatible metals causing bad contact due to corrosion
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13 How DOS Addresses Physical Memory Assigning addresses to both RAM and ROM: Occurs during booting (sometimes called memory mapping) Is done by every OS
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14 Logical Memory Layout The PC hardware memory layout is consistent no matter which operating
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2011 for the course HWD 101 taught by Professor Brain during the Spring '11 term at Seneca.

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W6IntLect - Memory Modules 1 DIP (Dual Inline Package) DRAM...

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