Chapter02 - Chapter2 The Constitution...

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Chapter 2 The  Constitution
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Impact of Colonial Experience   Jamestown  – first permanent English  colony (1607); set precedent for a  representative assembly Plymouth  –  Mayflower Compact  (1620)  set precedent for  social contract  based on  the consent of the governed; adult males  agreed to create and submit to authority of  government
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Selected Milestones in the  Colonial/Early American Era   Stamp Act (1765) First Continental Congress (1774) Second Continental Congress (1775) Revolutionary War (1775-1781) Declaration of Independence (1776) Articles of Confederation drafted (1777) Shays’ Rebellion (1786) Constitutional Convention (1787) U.S. Constitution (1788) Bill of Rights (1791)
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Reading Exercise Consult the  Declaration of Independence   (pages 371-372) What does Jefferson mean by  unalienable  Rights ?  What are they? What is the  purpose  of government? What is the  basis of government’s  legitimacy/authority? Under what conditions is  Revolution   justifiable according to Jefferson?
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Key Ideas in the  Declaration of  Independence Natural Rights  – individuals hold certain rights because they are  human; governments cannot take away these “unalienable”  (inalienable, can’t be transferred) rights; they are given to us by  God Locke describes these rights as “life, liberty, and property” Jefferson describes these rights as “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of  Happiness” Social contract  – general agreement between the people and the  government; people agree to give up some of their liberties so that  the remainder are protected Popular sovereignty/government by consent  – all legitimate  authority flows from consent of people Right/Duty to revolt  (Revolution) Adopted by 2 nd  Continental Congress (July 4, 1776)
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Chapter02 - Chapter2 The Constitution...

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