Constitution - Chapter2 The Constitution ColonialExperience

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Chapter 2 The  Constitution
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Colonial Experience   Jamestown  – first permanent English  colony (1607) precedent for  representative assembly Plymouth  –  Mayflower Compact  (1620)  precedent for  social contract consent of governed adult males created, submitted to authority of  government
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Selected Milestones   Stamp Act (1765) First Continental Congress (1774) Second Continental Congress (1775) Revolutionary War (1775-1781) Declaration of Independence (1776) Articles of Confederation drafted (1777) Shays’ Rebellion (1786) Constitutional Convention (1787) U.S. Constitution (1788) Bill of Rights (1791)
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Reading Exercise Consult the  Declaration of Independence   (pages 359-360) What does Jefferson mean by  unalienable  Rights ? What are they? What is the  purpose  of government? What is the  basis of government’s  legitimacy/authority? Under what conditions is  Revolution   justifiable?
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Key Ideas in  Declaration Natural Rights  – individuals hold certain rights because they  are human; governments cannot take away these  “unalienable” (inalienable, can’t be transferred) rights; given to  us by God Locke -- “life, liberty, and property” Jefferson -- “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness” Social contract  – general agreement between people and  government; people agree to give up some liberties so  remainder are protected Popular sovereignty/government by consent  – all legitimate  authority flows from consent of people Right/Duty to revolt  (Revolution) Adopted by 2 nd  Continental Congress (July 4, 1776)
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Discussion Question Why did Jefferson write,  “…pursuit of  happiness”  rather than “property”? Let’s assume he wasn’t trying to cover up 
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2011 for the course POLS 130 taught by Professor Josephsalazar during the Summer '10 term at University of Hawaii, Manoa.

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Constitution - Chapter2 The Constitution ColonialExperience

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