David Chapter 11 mod

David Chapter 11 mod - Chapter 11 I NTERNATIONAL O CEAN T...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 11 I NTERNATIONAL O CEAN T RANSPORTATION LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the end of this chapter the student should be able to: 1 Identify the types of ocean transportation services and vessel sizes. 2 Understand the significance of ship flags, conferences, and liability conventions. 3 Understand the security requirements of the United States. 4 Understand the security requirements of the IMO. 5 Understand the function of non-vessel-operating common carriers (NVOCC). PREVIEW It is important to understand types of ship service and the types of ships available, so the shipper can know the correct marine application to make to successfully transport cargo. Besides examining these topics this chapter discusses other important issues such as flag of registration, conferences, liability conventions and the services of non-vessel-operating common carriers. 11-2 Chapter 11 International Ocean Transportation CHAPTER OUTLINE 11-1 Types of Service I. Liner ships operate on a pre-established schedule and with determined ports of call. II. Tramp ships operate wherever the market dictates. III. Analogy is of a liner as a public bus, a tramp as a taxicab. 11-2 Size of Vessels 11-2a Dead-Weight Tonnage I. Total capacity of ship expressed in long tons (2,240 pounds), or metric tons (2,204.6 pounds) II. Measured using weight of the difference in water displacement when ship is empty and when it is full III. Does not include: a. Fuel of ship, called the bunker b. Does not include supplies of ship, called the stores 11-2b Registered Tonnage I. Gross Registered Tonnage is total volume capacity of the ship expressed in hundreds of cubic feet (2.83 cubic meters). II. Only measures capacity below deck III. Used to determine tax in country ship is registered or for fees for ports and canals IV. Net [Registered] Tonnage is tonnage minus engine room, crews space and other space necessary for operation of ship. 11-2c Displacement I. Displacement Tonnage is total weight of the ship, when fully loaded, measured by the weight of the volume of the water it displaces. II. Light Tonnage is weight of the ship, measured the same way, when the ship is empty. 11-2d Plimsoll Lines I. Lines painted on hull to indicate different allowable drafts (how deep ship sits in water) in different situations II. Draft is determined by season, latitudes and density of water. a. Deepest a ship can sit is called tropical line. b. Next is summer line c. Next is winter line d. Then there is the winter-North Atlantic line. Chapter 9 International Ocean Transport 11-3 e. There is also a fresh water line, since ships sit deeper in freshwater than saltwater. 11-2e Size Categories I. Difference is made between ships that can pass through the Panama Canal and those that cannot a. Maximum size that goes through locks is called Panamax ship....
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David Chapter 11 mod - Chapter 11 I NTERNATIONAL O CEAN T...

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