Chapter1 - Chapter 1 A First Look at Statistics and Data...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 1 A First Look at Statistics and Data Collection
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Statistics A science comprising of rules and procedures that are used for collection, summarization, presentation, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data. For example, the manager of a company asked his 36 employees about how many times a day they visited the internet. The number of times the employees visited the web during a day are as follows: 11, 9, 12, 7, 1, 17, 8, 14, 18, 1, 13, 11, 16, 11, 6, 13, 16, 7, 11, 12, 2, 12, 13, 17, 15, 8, 23, 6, 18, 24, 4, 21, 11, 12, 22, 6. The above data can be summarized in a table as follows: Number of Visits Number of Employees 1 to 5 4 6 to 10 8 11 to 15 14 16 to 20 6 21 to 25 4 36
Background image of page 2
3 Uses of Statistics in Business Quality Control Product Planning Forecasting Yearly Reports Personnel Management Market Research
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Basic Definitions Population: The set of ALL possible measurements that are of interest. Measurements pertain to a group of people or objects. Examples include (1) ALL students at UNT, (2) ALL students of UNT who own a car, (3) ALL registered voters in the US, (4) ALL production workers at TI, and so on. Two types of population are (1) Finite Population, and (2) Infinite Population. Finite Population: A population of finite items. That is, finite population represents a population whose items can be counted. Examples include (1) ALL individuals in Denton County, (2) ALL registered students of Summer 5W1 at UNT, and so on. Infinite Population: A population of infinite items. That is, an infinite population represents a population whose items can not be counted or are too large to be counted. Examples include (1) ALL fishes in a lake, (2) ALL caribous in Australia, and so on.
Background image of page 4
5 Basic Definitions Sample: A subset of fraction of the population selected for observation. For example, a group of 50 students out of all students at UNT will comprise a sample. Simple Random Sample:
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

Chapter1 - Chapter 1 A First Look at Statistics and Data...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online