ER Ch05 Solution Manual

ER Ch05 Solution Manual - CHAPTER 5 THE MARKET FOR FOREIGN...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
IM-29 CHAPTER 5 THE MARKET FOR FOREIGN EXCHANGE SUGGESTED ANSWERS AND SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTER QUESTIONS AND PROBLEMS QUESTIONS 1. Give a full definition of the market for foreign exchange. Answer: Broadly defined, the foreign exchange (FX) market encompasses the conversion of purchasing power from one currency into another, bank deposits of foreign currency, the extension of credit denominated in a foreign currency, foreign trade financing, and trading in foreign currency options and futures contracts. 2. What is the difference between the retail or client market and the wholesale or interbank market for foreign exchange? Answer: The market for foreign exchange can be viewed as a two-tier market. One tier is the wholesale or interbank market and the other tier is the retail or client market . International banks provide the core of the FX market. They stand willing to buy or sell foreign currency for their own account. These international banks serve their retail clients, corporations or individuals, in conducting foreign commerce or making international investment in financial assets that requires foreign exchange. Retail transactions account for only about 14 percent of FX trades. The other 86 percent is interbank trades between international banks, or non-bank dealers large enough to transact in the interbank market. 3. Who are the market participants in the foreign exchange market? Answer: The market participants that comprise the FX market can be categorized into five groups: international banks, bank customers, non-bank dealers, FX brokers, and central banks. International banks provide the core of the FX market. Approximately 100 to 200 banks worldwide make a market in foreign exchange, i.e., they stand willing to buy or sell foreign currency for their own account. These international banks serve their retail clients, the bank customers , in conducting foreign commerce or making international investment in financial assets that requires foreign exchange. Non-bank dealers are large non-bank financial institutions, such as investment banks, mutual funds, pension funds, and hedge funds, whose size and frequency of trades make it cost- effective to establish their own dealing rooms to
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
IM-30 trade directly in the interbank market for their foreign exchange needs. Most interbank trades are speculative or arbitrage transactions where market participants attempt to correctly judge the future direction of price movements in one currency versus another or attempt to profit from temporary price discrepancies in currencies between competing dealers. FX brokers match dealer orders to buy and sell currencies for a fee, but do not take a position themselves. Interbank traders use a broker primarily to disseminate as quickly as possible a currency quote to many other dealers. Central banks
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

ER Ch05 Solution Manual - CHAPTER 5 THE MARKET FOR FOREIGN...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online