PN_2005_UNandCT_PubConfPaper

Counter-Terrorism Law and Practice: An International Handbook

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1 The United Nations and Counter-terrorism After September 11: towards an assessment of the impact and prospects of counter-terror ‘spill-over’ into international criminal justice cooperation Paul Norman, 2005 Paper to British Society of Criminology Conference 6-9 th July 2004, University of Portsmouth. Centre for European Studies Research, University of Portsmouth Abstract The paper focuses on the recent role of the United Nations (UN) after the attacks of 11 September 2001 in improving the effectiveness and commitment of states to counter- terrorism through the development of domestic legislation, policy and practice. The post- Cold War context provided a facilitative environment for the UN Security Council enabling ad hoc or case-by-case responses to acts of terrorism during the 1990s. However, the paper argues that the intervention of the Security Council in the aftermath of ‘9/11’ has proved to be a decisive break-point to a comprehensive regime that binds states to international legal norms against acts of terrorism and increases the obligations to undertake ‘executive action’ against all forms of terrorism. Realisation is contingent on a substantive improvement to international criminal justice cooperation in general, raising the prospect of ‘spill over’ effects into other areas of criminal police and judicial policy and practice. The response of the UN Security Council in countering terrorism after 11 September 2001 should be regarded as a unique example of international criminal justice policy-making, articulated through the broad-based ongoing enforcement and capacity-building work of a ‘Counter Terrorism Committee’. This has been made possible via the political commitment Published as: Norman, P. (2005) The United Nations and Counter-terrorism After September 11: towards an assessment of the impact and prospects of counter-terror ‘spill-over’ into international criminal justice cooperation. Proceedings of the British Society of Criminology Conference 6- 9 th July 2004, University of Portsmouth.
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2 and financial sponsorship of the Group of Eight and other international organisations in which these countries play key roles. Further, the strategy to concurrently push the agenda downwards and outwards to regional and international organisations respectively, has led to the adoption of counter-terrorism as a criminal justice priority by a wide range of regional and sub-regional organisations. Arguably, this will provide longevity in the strategy, but also facilitates the spill over of counter-terrorism executive action into the wider criminal justice cooperation. This paper does not seek to provide a definitive analysis or conclusion on these factors, but seeks to make the case for a broader research agenda focussed upon the UN and counter-terrorism. Introduction
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PN_2005_UNandCT_PubConfPaper - Published as: Norman, P....

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