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اوربا وال&

Counter-Terrorism Law and Practice: An International Handbook

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September 2008 71 The Legal and Political Implications of the Securitisation of Counter-Terrorism Measures across the Mediterranean Francesca Galli
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This report was produced with the financial assistance of the European Commission, under contract MED-2005/109-063. The text is the sole responsibility of the authors and in no way reflects the official opinion of the European Commission. Acknowledgements This report was conducted under the auspices of the Centre of International Studies of the University of Cambridge. Fran- cesca Galli is a PhD student at Cambridge University.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 4 The Conceptual Framework: The Securitisation Process 5 Domestic Security Policies in European Countries 6 The South Mediterranean 9 The Evolution of European Union Anti-terrorism Policies 11 European Security Dialogue towards the Mediterranean 16 Outcomes 19 Annex: The Security Regimes in Britain and France 21 France 21 The United Kingdom 22 Selected Bibliography 25 Previous EuroMeSCo Publications 32
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The Legal and Political Implications of the Securitisation of Counter-Terrorism Measures across the Mediterranean 4 71 September 2008 Executive Summary During the twelve years that have elapsed since the signing of the Barcelona Declaration, the concept of security has proven central to the debate between the Northern and Sou- thern Mediterranean partners of the Barcelona Process. Yet this concept evolved as rapidly and profoundly as it has because the events of September 11, 2001 (and their aftermath) have clearly had a major impact on the theoretical discourse on security 1 . The terrorist atta- cks in the United States (September 11, 2001), Madrid (March 11, 2004) and London (July 7, 2005), demonstrated the seriousness of the globalised security threat posed by terrorism – such that both the European Union’s threat assessment and approach to security have subsequently been transformed. As a result of the impact of these events, the Union decided to take more determined con- crete steps to deal with the issue of terrorism, and the concept itself has undergone a securitisation process. Consequently, terrorism is today considered one of the most se- rious global security threats to the European Union and it promises to be at the core of future developments in Europe’s security strategy. In fact, some of the institutions and practices in operation within the Barcelona Process – the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership – had already contributed to the convergence of views between the Union and North Africa on security and democracy issues before the previously mentioned terrorist attacks had even taken place. In addition, ever since the Union has progressively incorporated the fight against terrorism into policies concerned with both its external relations and its security dimension, both the Common Foreign and Security Policy and measures developed within the framework of the Maastricht Third Pillar (originally called Justice and Home Affairs and
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