Chapter VI and so on - Chapter VI: Why the Demise of...

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Chapter VI: Why the Demise of Comfort Thesis: A) Patterns of Change a. The rate of decline in the Roman economy varied throughout the empire i. Roman Britain’s decline was quick and rapid ii. Western Mediterranean was slower and gradual iii. Italy and North Africa was slow decline iv. Eastern Empire in 5 th and 6 th century prospered and declined in the 7 th century 1. New coins 2. New rural houses 3. New potteries v. Aegean region saw disappearance of population pg. 126 b. Levant and Egypt are the only regions to survive the overall decline by AD 700 i. Various complex potteries (Jerash) ii. New copper coins iii. Scythopolis Pg. 126 B) The End of an Empire and the End of the Economy a. The decline of the Roman economy can be correlated with the decline in Roman politics and military i. Britain’s decline caused by Roman withdrawal from province
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ii. Compare and Contrast Eastern Empire and Western Empire during time of western empire’s decline iii. Eastern Empire’s decline came around the 6 th and 7 th century during invasions by Slavs, Avar, Persians and Arabs pg. 129 iv. Devastation of Eastern Empire at Thessalonica pg. 130 b. The complex economy of the Roman Empire is responsible for Italy’s intervals of relief as well as the empire’s overall breakdown. i. Links between Italy and Africa supported each other ii. Carthage sacked by vandals affected Rome iii. Good times brought wealth to each other and vice versa c. The Roman empire encourage economic growth in various ways i. Upkeep of soldiers and military spending stimulated economy ii. Emperors maintained massive infrastructure and the use of currency iii. Upkeep of roads d. Other factors thought small affected the overall decline of the empire i. Bubonic plague ii. Disrupted growing season due to sun C) Experiencing the Collapse a. Life during the Collapse of the Roman empire was far from pleasant… i. Life of Saint Severinus
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ii. Citizens Batavis begged for trade iii. Lauriacum and the expectation of olive oil for cooking instead of fat iv. Paying the soldiers of Ravenna
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2011 for the course BIO 128 taught by Professor Ching during the Spring '11 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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Chapter VI and so on - Chapter VI: Why the Demise of...

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