01Lecture-Ch1-Ch2

01Lecture-Ch1-Ch2 - Integrated Manufacturing Systems...

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems ENGR3300U – Lecture 01 Overview of Manufacturing Chapter 2 2.1 – Manufacturing industries 2.3 – Production facilities 2.4.3 – Manufacturing capability Chapter 1 1.2 – Automation in production systems 1.3 – Manual labor in production systems 1.4 – Automation principles & strategies
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What is Manufacturing Application of physical and chemical processes to alter geometry, properties, and/or appearance of a starting material to make parts or products Manufacturing also includes assembly Almost always carried out as a sequence of operations
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Manufacturing - Economically Figure 1.1 (b) Manufacturing as an economic process Transformation of materials into items of greater value by means of one or more processing and/or assembly operations Manufacturing adds value to the material by changing its shape or properties, or by combining it with other materials
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Manufacturing Industry classification Process industries , e.g., chemicals, petroleum, basic metals, foods and beverages, power generation Continuous production Batch production Discrete product (and part) industries, e.g., cars, aircraft, appliances, machinery, and their component parts Continuous production Batch production In this course, we deal with discrete parts and products only.
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Process Industries & Discrete Manufacturing Industries
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Product Variety P Product variety P refers to different product types or models produced in the plant Soft product variety - small differences between products, e.g., between car models made on the same production line, with many common parts among models Hard product variety - products differ substantially, e.g., between a small car and a large truck, with few common parts (if any)
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Production Quantity Q The quantity of products Q made by a factory has an important influence on the way its people, facilities, and procedures are organized Annual production quantities can be classified into three ranges: Production range Annual Quantity Q Low production 1 to 100 units Medium production 100 to 10,000 units High production 10,000 to millions of Different production facilities are required for each of the 3 ranges & product variety
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Product variety VS Product Quantity Figure 2.5 Relationship between product variety and production quantity in discrete manufacturing
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Low Production Job shop is used for this type of production facility A job shop makes low quantities of specialized and customized products Products are typically complex, e.g., space capsules, prototype aircraft, special machinery Equipment in a job shop is general purpose Labor force is highly skilled Designed for maximum flexibility
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01Lecture-Ch1-Ch2 - Integrated Manufacturing Systems...

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