chapter3 - Chapter Three: Themes of Art The Sacred Realm...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter Three: Themes of Art The Sacred Realm Politics and the Social Order tories and Histories Looking Outward Stories and Histories he Here and Now) (The Here and Now) Looking Inward he Human Experience) (The Human Experience) Invention and Fantasy rt and Nature Art and Nature Art and Art
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
hapter Three: Themes of Art Chapter Three: Themes of Art The Sacred Realm
Background image of page 2
Rathnasambhava, the Transcendent Buddha of the South. Tibet, 13 th c. CE. Opaque watercolor on cloth, height 36”. LA County Museum of Art
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cimabue, Madonna Enthroned , c. 1280-1290. Tempera on wood 12' 7" x 7' 4". Rathnasambhava, the Transcendent Buddha of the South . Tibet, 13 th c. CE. Opaque watercolor on cloth, height 36”. ,g
Background image of page 4
Isis Nursing Horus Egypt. Ptolemaic Period (ca. 300–30 B.C.) aience; h Faience; h. 6.7 in. Metropolitan, NY i b Cimabue, Madonna Enthroned c. 1280-1290. Tempera on wood 12' 7" x 7' 4".
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hathor nursing the infant Horus.
Background image of page 6
Virgin and Child Before a Firescreen, by a follower of Robert Campin. y 1440. Oil with egg tempera on oak with walnut additions 63.4 x 48.5 cm. National Gallery, London.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
dam and Eve Adam and Eve Banished from Paradise From Garden of the Happy by Fuduli Turkey, 18 th c.
Background image of page 8
Monumental Buddha , Bamiyan, Afghanistan. 5-7 th c. CE. Stone, height 175’. Destroyed by the Taliban in 2001 Iconoclasm: (Greek – “image breaking”) Destruction of religious images. In Christianity and Islam, iconoclasm was based on the Mosaic prohibition against making graven images, which were associated with idolatry. People who engage in such practices are called iconoclasts.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Statues in the Cathedral of Saint Martin, Utrecht, attacked in in the 16th century. Reformation iconoclasm
Background image of page 10
SAENREDAM, Pieter Jansz (Dutch painter) Interior of the Church of St Bavo in Haarlem 1648 Oil on panel, 200 x 140 cm National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Woodcut image from the 1563 edition of Foxe's Book of Martyrs, depicting iconoclasm. In the top part of the image "papists" are packing away their "paltry," while the church is purged of idols.
Background image of page 12
Catholic crucifix and Protestant cross
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
hemes of Art Themes of Art Politics and the Social Order
Background image of page 14
Equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius (before restoration), 164-166 C.E. Bronze, 11' 6" high. Piazza del Campidoglio, Rome.
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Constantly regard the universe as one living being, having one substance and one soul; and observe how all things have reference to one perception, the perception of this one living eing nd ho ll things t being; and how all things act with one movement; and how all things are the cooperating causes of all things which exist.
Background image of page 16
Image of page 17
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course ART 101 taught by Professor Drexler,d during the Fall '08 term at University of Hawaii, Manoa.

Page1 / 70

chapter3 - Chapter Three: Themes of Art The Sacred Realm...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 17. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online