IntroDramaWk4MEDIEVALEveryman

IntroDramaWk4MEDIEVALEveryman - Introduction to Drama Week...

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Introduction to Drama Week Four: Medieval Drama, Everyman; Renaissance Drama
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Medieval Drama Medieval Period (476-1500) covers from fall of Rome to beginning of Renaissance. Much political turmoil; no reliable political structure The church was the only stable “government” and it exerted its influence Roman Catholic church begins employing drama within the mass (Liturgical Drama) Played by clerics and priests; performed in Latin Other drama is performed outside the church, in the vernacular Primary staging technique: Mansions
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Medieval Stage: Mansion Small scenic structures for indicating location (ie, a throne might equal the palace of Pilate). In more complex plays, there were several mansions.
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Transition from within the Church to outside of the Church By 1350, plays were in the vernacular, rather than Latin Performed by laymen (male members of the community, but some women on stage in France) Stories began to expand beyond what they were when part of liturgical services Church seemed to support these dramas Why move outdoors? Probably because of the expanding needs of the plays.
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Staging: Outside the Church Fixed (primarily the Mansion) Mansions set up in available spaces (courtyards, town squares), arranged in straight lines or rectangles or circles, depending on the space Heaven and Hell were at opposite ends Moveable (Pageant Wagons) Moved through the streets while the audience stayed in one place (like parade floats) Pageant refers to the stage, the play itself, and the spectacle. Plays performed in sequence (each play was performed several times)
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Medieval Stage: Pageant Wagon
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Pageant Wagon
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The Plays Aimed to teach or reinforce Church doctrine Stories rewarded the good/punished the evil Miracle Plays Lives of saints and the miracles they achieved, historical and legendary Mystery Plays Mystery refers to the craft guilds About Christ or from the Old Testament, usually done in cycles ( Second Shepherds’ Pageant , c.1450) Nonreligious plotlines and characters were frequently interwoven with the religious story being told Morality Plays Allegories, often of common man’s struggle for salvation ( Everyman , c. 1495)
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Everyman (c.1495) A morality play is an allegory in which characters personifying abstract ideas teach a moral lesson by acting out the conflict between Good and Evil The story Everyman is summoned by Death because God desires a reckoning
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IntroDramaWk4MEDIEVALEveryman - Introduction to Drama Week...

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