IntroDramaWks9-10

IntroDramaWks9-10 - Introduction to Drama Weeks 9-10: 19th...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to Drama Weeks 9-10: 19th c Drama through the Turn of the 20th c Henrik Ibsen, A Doll House ; August Strindberg, Miss Julie; O scar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
19th-Century Through the Turn of the Century Technical Innovations Gas lighting (Chestnut St Theatre, Philadelphia, 1816), scenery, architecture (building of new theatres) lay foundation for modern drama’s possibilities and promise of delivery. Romantic Drama Technical innovations lead to new possibilities in styles of acting and plays and in content. New philosophies lead to representations of the individual and democracy. Common for the Romantics to re-work earlier plays into romantic (individual) perspective
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
19th-Century Through the Turn of the Century Melodrama A suspenseful play filled with situations that appeal to the audience’s emotions. Justice triumphs in a happy ending; the good (completely virtuous) are rewarded and the bad (thoroughly villainous) are punished. Music. The Well-Made Play Exposition (Act I) Complication (Act II) { Earnest , largely, but not Crisis (Act III) {exclusively Resolution (Act IV)
Background image of page 4
19th-Century Through the Turn of the Century The Rise of Realism Influenced by: technology, Zola (naturalism), political and philosophical contributions (the individual) Early conduits: Ibsen and Strindberg (on the continent); Wilde and Shaw (in England), the early plays of O’Casey (Ireland) Audience gets a sense of eavesdropping on real people Demonstrated that the stage could air radical social ideas (even covertly, as with Wilde) Rebelled against commercial interests which dominated theatre practice in second half of 19th c: Rejected tradition of melodrama, music hall, long-running revivals of Shakespeare and French well-made plays Hallmarks: political engagement with social context, artistically innovative
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ibsen and Strindberg: The First Playwrights of Modern Drama Do not use that foreign word “ideals.” We have that excellent native word “lies.” —Ibsen Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) The theatre is a weapon. August Strindberg (1849-1912)
Background image of page 6
Personal Common Ground Born and raised far away from London theatre scene (Ibsen: Norway; Strindberg: Sweden) As youths, face hardships of parental financial situations and closely observe social strata Both leave their native countries looking for success and for being ‘out of step’ with social and intellectual
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 24

IntroDramaWks9-10 - Introduction to Drama Weeks 9-10: 19th...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online