argument handout - Handout: Philosophical Arguments, pt. 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Handout: Philosophical Arguments, pt. 1 Arguments have two components, called premises and conclusions . The premises of the argument support the conclusion. The following example illustrates how arguments occur in everyday conversations. “I don’t think I’ll be going out this weekend if there’s a chance of snow. And this morning the weather forecast called for snow. So it looks like I’ll be staying in this weekend.” Notice that the above argument can be restated in the following formal manner. P1 If there is a chance of snow this weekend, I will not go out. P2 There is a chance of snow this weekend. C I will not go out. In the above formalization, P1 and P2 are the premises, and C is the conclusion. When reading philosophical texts, it’s important to look for arguments, and to try to identify their premises and conclusions. This is a useful skill in everyday conversations, too! So how do we do it? One effective strategy is to find the conclusion first. The conclusion can often be identified by the use of such words as “therefore”, “so”, “thus”, and “hence”. Once the conclusion is found, we can search for all of the surrounding claims that support it. These will be the premises of the argument. Here’s an example: “I believe that every batter on Red Sox this year will have a batting average better than .250. And I believe that Big Papi will be a batter on the Red Sox this year, so I believe that Big Papi will have a batting average better than .250”
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course PHIL 100 taught by Professor Ames during the Fall '10 term at University of Hawaii, Manoa.

Page1 / 4

argument handout - Handout: Philosophical Arguments, pt. 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online