chapter_05 - Chapter 5 Condensation: Dew, Fog, and Clouds...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Chapter 5 Condensation: Dew, Fog, and Clouds
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I. Dew and Frost § Dew – water vapor that condenses upon surfaces when the temp lowers to the dew point § If vapor deposits directly to a solid, frost forms
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Conditions for Dew and Frost § Dew or frost form on clear, calm nights when there is good radiational cooling. § These conditions are associated with High Pressure
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II. Condensation Nuclei
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§ A layer of dust, salt, or pollution in the air III. Haze
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IV. Fog § Fog is a cloud resting near the ground § Fog is formed by: Changing the Temperature (Cooling) § air is cooled to the dew point Changing the Moisture content § Adding water vapor via evaporation § Raising the dew point to equal the temperature § Fog is maintained by: Formation of new fog droplets via the above processes
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Radiation Fog § Radiation fog is formed by radiational cooling that cools air to the dew point Clear nights with a shallow layer of moist air near the surface and a light breeze
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Advection Fog § Surface air can cool to its dew point through warm air moving over a cold surface Heat transfers from air to surface § Must have air movement
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Advection Fog § Pacific coast – warm air, cold water § Further inland, land is too warm to cool air so fog dissipates § Advection-radiation fog Warm air from Gulf encounters land cooled by radiational cooling
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Upslope Fog § Usually when air in lower eastern plains is cooler than normal § Can form over an extensive area for many days § Moist air flows upward along a barrier § Typical along eastern Rockies in winter and spring § The 3 fogs we’ve just discussed are all cooling fogs
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§ Steam Fog forms when cold air moves over warm water § Frontal Fog forms when rain falls though a layer of cold air Also called Precipitation Fog Evaporation (Mixing Fog)
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Annual Days with Dense Fog § Pacific Coast states § Appalachian highland region § New England § Fog can help bring moisture for vegetation § Fog is a transportation hazard – auto, boat, air
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V. Clouds Latin Root Translation Example cumulus stratus cirrus nimbus heap layer curl of hair rain fair weather cumulus altostratus cirrus cumulonimbus http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/cld/cldtyp/home.rxml
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High Clouds - Cirrus § Form above 20,000 ft § White, thin, wispy § Blown by high winds § Move from west to east with prevailing winds § Not associated with precipitation
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course EAS 107 taught by Professor Pan,z during the Spring '08 term at Saint Louis.

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chapter_05 - Chapter 5 Condensation: Dew, Fog, and Clouds...

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