philosophyOption1

philosophyOption1 - Believing that sometimes one should do...

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Karlo Natonton Philosophy 105 Option 1 Instructor: Alex Plato October 6, 2009 Alexander R. Pruss was correct in calling the eight errors “errors” in his essay “Eight Ethical Errors.” Pruss is correct in doing so because each of his points are lapses in judgment and reasoning that all people experience. People do not even realize it because they were either taught the wrong way to think or because they never knew better. Many of Pruss’ ethical errors have become accepted ways of thinking in today’s societies around the world. Thinking that “sometimes you should do the wrong thing” or holding one’s self to relativism are both ideas that people have adopted. With the issue of abortion being such an intriguing topic, these ethical errors are becoming more noticeable. I have committed some of Pruss’ eight ethical errors throughout my life.
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Unformatted text preview: Believing that sometimes one should do the wrong thing is a reoccurring error that I commit. A poor man stealing food to provide for his family is an example of where I know the action is wrong, but I completely understand why the man is doing it. This is also an example of Pruss’ sixth ethical error that states, “You may do what it takes to survive.” I also am a consequentialist. I do not tell my parents or any authoritative relatives everything that I do or do not do in college. If I tell them, it would only disappoint them and feel angry or stressed. Rather than telling them every single thing, I tell a “white-lie” that harms no one in the end. Many of Pruss’ eight ethical errors are easy to commit and can be done so without even realizing it because of today’s society....
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course PHIL 105 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '10 term at Saint Louis.

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