Philosophy Notes

Philosophy Notes - Philosophy Notes To be a good...

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Philosophy Notes To be a good philosopher you must take the best arguments from both sides and present them. Strawman fallacy: presenting a bad argument for the other side and then tearing it down with your side of the presentation ;; terrible way to argue something ;; this would make you uncharitable Argument -> premise 1+ premise 2 = conclusion If the argument isn’t good it doesn’t necessarily make the Conclusion false. Beliefs-? ->secondary to truth and falsehood 1Affirm \ Beliefs: 2 Withhold/suspend judgment - Commitments 3 Deny / Withhold/suspend judgment = both arguments provided valid evidence Affirm = when a point is clearly proven and evident,, beyond a reasonable doubt//absolute certainty Truth/fact (independent of beliefs) Belief Commitments 3 (affirm, withhold, deny) knowledge Evidence/reasons “True for me” – I believe… Just because everyone believes something doesn’t make it true True Knowledge [I know something because it’s true] To have/to be a truth it must be true in reality. Truth = fact/what is Strong belief – adamant/passionate about it when challenged about it can feel like being personally attacked
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Self-evident = the natural nature is clearly true [[not necessarily true]] ex: no rocks are courageous If there is a disagreement doesn’t make it true or false or make us know necessarily true Morality = emotivism: expressing an emotion of themselves I.e. killing is wrong -> ouch Truth-claim: what is/what are about the way the world is What is? Truth-indicative If you know p [sufficient condition], then you know how you know p [necessary condition condition/hypothetical] Interpretation vs. Philosophizing Declaration of Independence: X is what a government should do and not x = we have the right and a duty to abolish the government and start over Sentences: Imperative – command Indicative – statement [about the way the world is] Interrogative - question Self-evident: Ex 1: no rocks are courageous Ex 2: nothing is colored, unless it’s extended **no/nothing = universal and all Universal indicative ----------------- Non-universal (particular)
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not possibly false – universal/always true if, then condition, follows philosophy you only can go from what is stated/said 1. If it is raining then it is wet outside 2. It is wet outside 3. It is raining Whenever an argument follows a logical sense it’s valid Sound If the premises is a truth and the conclusion is true and is valid the argument is sound If an argument is valid, but not sound it doesn’t tell us if it’s true or false Locke “Love of truth vs. enthusiasm” Major theme: the love of truth is not enough for something to be True. Does locke believe in god? Is he giving us any evidence that he doesn’t or does exist? Does he want us to believe in god or not? I feel as if locke wants to believe on god but won’t let himself because it is not self-evident as to
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course PHIL 105 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '10 term at Saint Louis.

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Philosophy Notes - Philosophy Notes To be a good...

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