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Ethics First Exam Study Guide answer key

Ethics First Exam Study Guide answer key - Ethics First...

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Ethics First Exam Study Guide Drefcinski, Craig and Moreland on Moral/Ethical Relativism 1.) Drefcinski differentiates between ‘descriptive relativism’ and ‘moral relativism’ (referred to by Craig and Moreland as ‘ethical relativism’ and ‘normative relativism,’ which I pointed out in class is often described as ‘prescriptive relativism’). What is the difference between the descriptive on the one hand and the prescriptive/normative/ethical/moral on the other? Is the mere affirmation of the former class sufficient to provide an argument for the latter? Why or why not? -Descriptive relativism is simply a factual claim about how things happen to be; and also claims that different people have different eithical views. Also known as normative relativism. Also considered an “is” fallacy. -Moral relativism states that there is no fact of rightness or wrongness about things and is considered an “ought” fallacy. 2.) Drefcinski focuses on the version of ethical relativism known as ‘cultural relativism,’ according to which membership in a culture is what decides what is right and wrong for members of that culture. He provides five reasons to show why it fails as an adequate system of ethics. Describe as many of these short arguments as you can. Versions of some of these same arguments can be found in Craig and Moreland also, so these can be listed, as well. a.) Extremely difficult to define the boundaries of a distinct culture. Craig and Moreland’s example of the adulterous affair of two members of two different cultures in a hotel in a third culture/society is particularly instructive.
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