Lecture20 - Earthquakes What is an earthquake? An...

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Unformatted text preview: Earthquakes What is an earthquake? An earthquake is a vibration of the Earth produced by a rapid release of energy Energy released radiates in all directions from its source (focus or hypocenter) Energy is in the form of waves Sensitive instruments around the world record the event Epicenter is the position on the land surface directly above the focus igure 11.2 Earthquakes and faults Movements that produce earthquakes are usually associated with faults Most of the motion along faults can be explained by plate tectonics theory Many small earthquakes along divergent boundaries Many small-to-large, shallow earthquakes along transform boundaries Many small-to-large, shallow-to-deep earthquakes along convergent boundaries (especially in subduction zones) Figure 11.13 Theory of elastic rebound Rocks on both sides of an existing fault are deformed by tectonic forces Rocks bend and store elastic energy Frictional resistance holding the rocks together is overcome Slip begins at the focus Vibrations (earthquakes) occur as deformed rock springs back to original shape (elastic rebound)...
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course EAS 101 taught by Professor Kirschner during the Spring '11 term at Saint Louis.

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Lecture20 - Earthquakes What is an earthquake? An...

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