Lecture30 - Energy and Mineral Resources Environmental...

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Energy and Mineral Resources Environmental
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Figure 21.3 Until the industrial revolution and significant population growth of the 19th and 20th centuries, there were no real large-scale use of non- renewable resources. We will consider in this lecture the resources we use to fuel our industrial society and the impact this use is having on the environment. The United States is the largest consumer of energy and mineral (non-renewable) resources in the World.
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Renewable and nonrenewable resources ¾ Renewable resources Can be replenished over relatively short time spans Examples include Plants Animals for food Trees for lumber ¾ Nonrenewable resources Significant resource that takes millions of years to form Examples Fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) Metals (iron, copper, uranium, gold) ¾ Some resources, such as groundwater, can go in either category depending on how they are used
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U.S. energy consumption in 2001 Figure 21.4
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Nonrenewable Resource - Coal Coal ¾ Formed mostly from plant material ¾ Along with oil and natural gas, coal is commonly called a fossil fuel ¾ Major fuel used in power plants to generate electricity ¾ Problems with coal use include environmental damage from mining / air pollution Figure 21.5
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Figure 21.6A Underground mining is costly and historically dangerous
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Figure 21.6B Strip mining is cheaper, safer, but much more damaging to the land surface. http://www.lib.ndsu.nodak.edu/govdocs/text/greatplains/fig09.jpg
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http://www.sbceo.k12.ca.us/~mbguad/coal%20power%20plant%20(Converted.jpg http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ies/imagesieua /coal%20power%20plant.jpg http://www.tristategt.org/info/craig/ Coal-pile-and-stacks.jpg
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Oil and natural gas Derived from the remains of marine plants and animals that were buried rapidly enough to not undergo natural decomposition on the Earth’s surface Economically significant amounts of oil/gas accumulate in traps or reservoirs
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course EAS 101 taught by Professor Kirschner during the Spring '11 term at Saint Louis.

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Lecture30 - Energy and Mineral Resources Environmental...

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