NietzscheGM2 - On the Genealogy of Morality Lecture 2...

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On the Genealogy of Morality Lecture 2
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Nietzsche’s Project To offer a critique of contemporary (J-C) Morality (as opposed to “morality” in the broad sense of some system of values). To do so by offering a genealogical account of the origins of Morality. Nietzsche believes that this account will give us new information about Morality, which will undermine its authority.
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The Unity of the GM? Does the GM have unity beyond its application of the genealogical method? The three essays of the book seem to offer different diagnoses of the origins of morality. The first focuses on ressentiment , the second on bad conscience and the third on the ascetic ideal. Are each of these the starting point of different moralities (of different systems of morality)? Or do they describe three starting points of one?
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The Unity of the GM (2) They address the same system of morality. But they identify different sources for it - namely three related psychological sources for it: (1) ressentiment , (2) bad conscience, and (3) the ascetic ideal. Morality has at different times played different functions. In its present form, it weaves all of these functional threads together.
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“Slave” and “Noble Morality”
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“Noble” and “Slave” Morality Nietzsche distinguishes between a early system of norms (“master or noble morality”) and a later normative system, which is much closer to Morality as we know it nowadays (“slave morality”). Some features of “noble morality” are still present in contemporary Morality. Remember that new functions of the same social practice are layered on top of old ones –resulting in a complex set of practices and values.
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Historical Context The historical context Nietzsche has in mind is not what most of us would think of when we hear the words “master” and “slave”. Rather, he is thinking of the sort of social classes that existed in societies such as ancient Greece. A form of slavery, to be sure, but very different from what we think of.
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Nietzsche’s Evaluation of the Two It might seem clear that Nietzsche thinks highly of “noble morality” and that he thinks “slave morality” is a bad thing. But Nietzsche’s view is in fact more complicated
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 0010 taught by Professor Shin,m during the Spring '11 term at Pittsburgh.

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NietzscheGM2 - On the Genealogy of Morality Lecture 2...

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