five senses - There are, traditionally, five senses: sight,...

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There are, traditionally, five senses: sight, smell, taste, touch, and hearing. Each of the five senses consists of organs with specialized cells that have receptors for specific stimuli (Zamora, 2006). These cells have links to the nervous system and thus to the brain. Sensing is done at primitive levels in the cells and integrated into sensations in the nervous system. Sight is probably the most developed sense in humans, followed closely by hearing. When looking at the eye, it seems like a simple structure. But, there is so much more to it than one can see outwardly. Three layers of tissue form the eyeball: the sclera, the choroid, and the retina (Patton, 2008). The outer layer of sclera consists of tough fibrous tissue. The "white" of the eye is part of the front surface of the sclera. The other part of the front surface of the sclera is called the cornea and is sometimes spoken of as the window of the eye because of its transparency. Just casually looking at the eye, the cornea does not look transparent, but instead looks colored, but that is because it covers the iris, a colored muscular part of the eye. The middle layer of the eyeball, the choroid, contains a dark pigment to prevent the scattering of incoming light rays. Two involuntary muscles make up the front part of the choroid. One is the
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five senses - There are, traditionally, five senses: sight,...

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