Nano Science (Lec2 Nano Characterization)

Nano Science (Lec2 Nano Characterization) - MAE 287/EE 257...

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MAE 287/EE 257
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Nano flower Nano Sunflower Nano mushroom Nano Bud As seen by scanning electron microscope
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ZnO Nanowire Forest As seen by scanning electron microscope
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Title: A Baseball Bat for the Nano Leagues Description: Tapered silicon pillar by Deep Reactive Ion Etching. Magnification: (3"x4" image): 10,800x Instrument: Philips XL30 scanning electron microscope Submitted by: Keith Morton, Princeton University
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Nano Bucky Badgers as seen by scanning electron microscope. Nano Bucky, created in the research lab of UW-Madison chemistry professor Robert J. Hamers, is composed of tiny carbon nanofiber "hairs," each just 75 nanometers in diameter.
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Nano Ring As seen by scanning electron microscope
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Nano spring As seen by transmission electron microscope
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Nano virus Imaged by transmission electron microscope
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Nano Smile Faces imaged by an atomic force microscope. The smile faces are only about 100 nanometers across, two nanometers thick and comprise about 14,000 DNA bases. Paul Rothemund, a computer scientist and an artist, although not necessarily in that order, used a few DNA molecules to make the smiley faces.
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IBM logo written with single Xenon atoms imaged by scanning tunneling microscope
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World Smallest Toilet Imaged by scanning electron microscope
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Sample Probe: - Photons (visible, x- ray, UV, Infrared) - Electrons - Ions - Sharp tip - Magnetic field Detected: - Photons (visible, x- ray, UV, Infrared) - Electrons -Ions
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Electron probe characterization SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) Scanning probe characterization AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) STM (Scanning Tunneling Microscope)
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Single Spot Mixed spot Resolved Spots d>λ d<<λ, a spot will become a ring The size of the ring will be determined by the spot size and the wavelength λ Resolution for a microscope R ~ 0.61 λ
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The Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) was the first type of Electron Microscope to be developed by Max Knoll and Ernst Ruska in Germany in 1931. The first Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) debuted in 1942 with the first commercial instruments around 1965. Its late development was due to the electronics involved in "scanning" the beam of electrons across the sample. Ernst Ruska Nobel Prize (1986)
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E (keV) λ (nm) 10 0.0122 100 0.0037 1000 0.00087 E-beam wavelength 1.23 (nm ) E (eV) : Electron wavelength E : Electron energy The theoretical resolution of an e- beam microscope is sub-atom. 0.61 R
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A JEOL JSM-7700F field emission SEM is shown. The resolution limit of this beautiful instrument is less than 1 nm. The resolution is 0.6 nm at 5 kV and 1.0 nm at 1 kV. Magnification capability ranges from 25 to as high as 2.0 million. Accelerating voltage ranges from 0.5 to approximately 30 kV.
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Electrons are produced with an electron gun. The electrons are then accelerated through the Anode plate and focused with the magnetic Lens.
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2011 for the course MAE 287 taught by Professor Yongchen during the Winter '11 term at UCLA.

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Nano Science (Lec2 Nano Characterization) - MAE 287/EE 257...

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