ct_efields

ct_efields - Charging by induction A positively charged rod...

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Charging by induction A positively charged rod is placed close to a conductor atttached to an insulating pedestal (a). After the opposite side of the conductor is grounded for a short time (b), the conductor becomes negatively charged (c). Based only on this information, what can we conclude about the motion of charges in the conductor? + + + + + + + + + + + + (a) (b) (c) - A. Both positive and negative charges move freely. B. Only negative charges move freely. C. Only positive charges move freely. D. We can’t really conclude anything.
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A hydrogen atom consists of a single electron orbiting a single proton. The electric force between the two particles in this atom is 2 . 3 × 10 39 greater than their gravitational force! If we could adjust the distance between the particles, could we find a separation at which the electric and gravitational forces are equal? A.
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course PHYS 1112 taught by Professor Seaton during the Spring '08 term at UGA.

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ct_efields - Charging by induction A positively charged rod...

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