PHI 103 -- THE FINAL PAPER

PHI 103 -- THE FINAL PAPER - ANWR Drilling 1 No way to...

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ANWR Drilling 1 No way to Drilling in the ANWR Ashley Dyal Dr. O’Leary PHI 103 September 1, 2010
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ANWR Drilling 2 No way to Drilling in the ANWR Part I: Thesis When the Arctic National Wildlife refuge is thought about most people think about the miles of ice caps one would see, the polar bears lounging around or playing with each other and then we hear the sounds of the seals barking for they have just had their fill of fresh fish for dinner. Now that this thought is so clear, picture numerous bulky oil drills, huge well pumps and all sorts of heavy hauling equipment popping up all around this area that is so breathtakingly tranquil. The debate for such action has been in the works for many years and both sides make valid points in trying to prove that their choice is the valid one to go with, but the decision is one that is very sensitive and one that should be made only with great thought and consideration behind it. After careful consideration of the facts and information that have been found my stance of no way to any drilling in any such habitat like the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge stands even stronger than before researching the sensitive topic. The two opposing sides for this sensitive debate are pretty simple being that there are really only two choices. One is either for drilling and exploiting of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge or one is against such drilling no matter what the logical reasoning might be for such an event. The idea of drilling some place where so many animals and people call home is one that should be automatically considered wrong by almost anyone. The concept that sticks out like a sore thumb in most people’s eyes is that if the area was considered a preserve of any sort it should stay that way. The animals that call the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge home depend on
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ANWR Drilling 3 such action to be taken. If this action is not protected against we might lose the vital fisheries and native wildlife that is indigenous to the area, along with the possibility of destroying the natural environment of the area that is indigenous to the area. In order to be fair on the subject a little bit of history might clear up whom and what got such a vital debate started. In the late nineteenth century John Muir and Gifford Pinchot started this vital debate that is still important key to many political officials and high ranked business that stand to profit from such drilling action. Both of these men fell on the middle of the fence when it came to believing that nature has value, but that is where their common ground stopped. Muir believed that preservation of the “natural wilderness should be untouched by human
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course PHI 103 taught by Professor O'leary during the Summer '10 term at Ashford University.

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PHI 103 -- THE FINAL PAPER - ANWR Drilling 1 No way to...

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