Vitamin C (lab 6) - Determining the Effects of Cooking on...

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Determining the Effects of Cooking on the Vitamin C Content of a Green Pepper By Joel I. Eldridge Abstract Titration analysis was implemented to measure the vitamin C content after the pepper underwent different methods of preparation. The completion of this experiment revealed that steamed pepper retained higher amount of vitamin C against the uncooked peppers. Introduction The objective of this experiment is to determine which cooking method would be better for maximum vitamin C retention. Fruits and vegetables contain large amounts of vitamins and minerals which are needed for a healthy functioning body. Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is an important vitamin that is required in higher amounts to other vitamins. Deficiency in vitamin C may result in diseases such as scurvy and it may also result in a decrease of the calcification of bones. Food preparation plays a key role as far as how much vitamin content remains
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In fact, studies show that oxidation, degradation, and vaporization are ways in which the vitamin content is depleted during cooking. Among being known as an immunity booster, vitamin C is a great reducing agent because it undergoes oxidation fairly easily. Vitamin C is also an antioxidant which makes it a great substance for combating carcinogens within the body. One way to determine the amount of vitamin C in food is to use a redox titration. The redox reaction is better than an acid-base titration since there are additional acids (citric) in some fruits and vegetables. Principle One way to determine the amount of vitamin C in food is to use a redox titration. The redox reaction is better than an acid-base titration since there are additional acids in a juice, but few of them interfere with the oxidation of ascorbic acid. As mentioned before, the concentration of vitamin C in the red pepper extracts is determined using a redox titration of the acidified extract with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS). The following equation illustrates how NBS oxidizes vitamin- C. The endpoint has been reached by the formation of a blue-black complex.
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course CHEMISTRY 210 taught by Professor Dr.han during the Spring '11 term at Fayetteville State University.

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Vitamin C (lab 6) - Determining the Effects of Cooking on...

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