speech - Good evening ladies and gentleman, my name is...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Good evening ladies and gentleman, my name is Mindee Deal and I stand before you today with a proposal that could potentially change the lives of so many impoverished Washington families, for the better. I must begin my plea for positive change with a brief history of the program I hope to improve. That of course being the Food Stamp Program. According to eHow.com The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Stamp Program, or FSP, was created on May 16, 1939, with stamps that came in two colors: orange for any food product and blue for surplus. The orange stamps had to be purchased, but for every dollar of orange stamps bought, the buyer received 50 cents of blue stamps for free. Then in 1943 lacking widespread unemployment and surplus crops, the program
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
ended. Only to be revived in 1961 by John F. Kennedy. He called it the New Stamp Pilot program which was essentially the same thing although surplus foods weren’t included. 1964 President Lyndon Johnson passed the initiative making the Food Stamp Act a permanent program. Finally the Food Stamp Act of 1977 eliminated the requirement for food stamps to be bought which immediately increased their popularity. To the tune of 1.5 million participants in little over a year. By 1980 the 20 million mark was exceeded bringing us to the current national rate, as of 2009, of 35.1 million people! THAT COMES OUT TO OVER $2.2 BILLION A YEAR The federal government first initiated the
Background image of page 2
program however the implementation and control is up to the individual state. In Washington, the Department of Social and Health Services controls our version of the program entitled Basic Food. Our staggering addition to the national figure is One million two hundred thirty-nine thousand- five hundred fifty-six participants in the Basic Food Program. Annually that costs comes out to $1,085 PER PERSON. According to our very own DSHS website. Washington has been hit hard by the economic downturn plaguing our nation. More and more of our residents have become dependent on state funded food assistance programs. With no sign of relief in sight, reform is our only option. Our dwindling ability to provide these services demands that we focus our resources on the truly needy. The key here is accountability to
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
residents that require them. These services are PRIVILEGES not RIGHTS. They should be treated as such. Governmentally funded programs like financial aid, Pell Grants for example are beneficial for everyone, in the long run. Educational spending yields a three to one return on investment according to President OBama’s State of The Union address in 2009. Yet the recipient of said aid must adhere to a standard of conduct. If caught using narcotics while receiving financial aid,penalties incur. As well they should. Yet the rhetorical hand out that Basic Food provides offers only a crutch for an atrophied limb weighing heavy on the weakened body that is our state. I propose that we, as a governing body, as
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/18/2011 for the course COMM 101 taught by Professor Jablonski during the Spring '11 term at Clark College.

Page1 / 16

speech - Good evening ladies and gentleman, my name is...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online