Aggression - Aggression The Effects of Aggression in Human...

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Aggression The Effects of Aggression in Human Nature Given the Circumstances Social Psychology Aggression
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Page 2 of 11 I. Examples of aggression in certain situations Stanford prison experiment Abu Ghraib incident The District of Columbia sniping incident II. Stanford prison experiment Inmates vs. guards Roles begin Inmates become depressed, guards become aggressive III. Abu Ghraib incident History behind the prison Enemies vs. Allies, aggression Disorders that arise because of aggression during war IV. D.C. snipers Explain the incident Logic behind the shootings Aggression that arose from the shootings V. Conclusion Description of why aggressive behaviors occurred in each situation The origin of aggression The Social Learning Theory Closing Argument Aggression
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Page 3 of 11 Everyone gets angry at some point in our life, which sometimes leads to aggression. But why does aggression occur, is it a learned behavior, biologically rooted, or is it due to our environmental factors? What happens if compliance turns a good person into someone that becomes habitually aggressive? We often see in the media when lack of obedience results into aggression, for instance the riots in Libya. Conformity by acting and believing in accordance with social pressure no longer exists and human nature changes. There are many examples of how human nature can be conformed given the circumstances, the Stanford experiment, the Abu Ghraib incident, and the District of Columbia sniper incident. Unfortunately, the effects of these circumstances can be detrimental to our psychological being and the way human nature can be changed into aggression given the circumstances. Human nature is defined as the psychological and social qualities that characterize humankind, such as thinking, acting and reacting to human behavior (Human nature, 2011). Aggression is the action of a state in violating by force the rights of another state, particularly its territorial rights; an unprovoked offensive, attack, or invasion. In psychiatry, aggression is known as overt or suppressed hostility, either innate or resulting from continued frustration and directed outward or against oneself (Aggression, 2011). The effects of aggression in human nature occur in many circumstances due to innate frustration or suppressed hostility in many. The nature of human aggression has been argued by many because our personalities, heredity, and environment play a role in violence and aggression. Biologists believe that human nature is due to the “genetically determined tendencies” toward aggressive behavior itself. A behaviorist would argue that aggression is due to experiences and learned behavior. Ultimately, it can be agreed that aggression in humans does not only occur because of biological origins, but by learned behaviors as well (Gordon & Smith, 2002). Unfortunately, the results of aggression can be deadly or can cause serious injuries and can lead to some of the following incidents. The Stanford experiment was research to see what happens when you put good people in a
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Aggression - Aggression The Effects of Aggression in Human...

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