01-intro to the aeneid - Virgil:TheAeneid...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Virgil: The  Aeneid Portrait of Virgil from a  manuscript of The  Aeneid   from 400 CE. This is the  earliest surviving copy of  this work. 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Aeneas and Achates help  to build Carthage (Book  II). From the manuscript of  400 CE.  2
Background image of page 2
Iapyx using a poultice  from Venus to heal  Aeneas’ wound. Ascanius  stands next to his father  but can’t watch.  Illustration of The  Aeneid   XII:562-578. From  Pompeii, c. 18 BCE – 79  CE. 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
I.  Commissioned by Caesar Augustus in 29 BCE a.  need for national epic to restore traditional Roman values: --re:  Livy : “the story of the greatest nation in the world”; “serious consideration of the kind of lives our ancestors  lived, of who were the men, and what the means both in war and politics by which Rome’s power was first  acquired and subsequently expanded”; “moral decline” = “old teaching was allowed to lapse”; Book I: The  Wanderings of Aeneas. .. b.  reinforce equation between Caesar Augustus and Aeneas (see next 5 slides) --via Julius Caesar and/or reincarnation c.  famous even before it was published; unfinished at Virgil’s death in 19 BCE The  Aeneid   = The Song of Aeneas (Just as The  Iliad  = The Song of Ilos [Troy], the difference being, of course,  that The  Iliad  did actually derive from song while The  Aeneid  is a purely written text, meant to be read rather  than heard. Virgil called his poem  Aeneid  as an homage to The  Iliad .) The  Aeneid 4
Background image of page 4
Caesar Augustus from Primaporta (Rome) c. 15-40 CE, copy of original of 20 BCE (discovered 1863) Marble. 6’8” Vatican Museums, Rome metaphor for Neptune quieting waves kicked up by storm, Virgil, The  Aeneid , I:201–210: When rioting breaks out in a great city, And the rampaging rabble goes so far
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

01-intro to the aeneid - Virgil:TheAeneid...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online