BIS%2C%20Lecture%2038%20Fall%202010

BIS%2C%20Lecture%2038%20Fall%202010 - Fall 2010 Lecture 38....

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Fall 2010 Lecture 38. Chordata Students should be able to: explain why we are all fishes recognize the major groups of chordates explain the features associated with terrestrial life in chordate evolution. Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes, lobe- finned fishes, Amphibia, Reptilia, Mammalia
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Why are we all fishes if fishes = ray-fins, coelocanths, and lungfishes?
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Ra y f i n e d s h Co l a c t L u g A m p b M T r Cr o Bi z ar k Vertebrate phylogeny: a major transition from water to land (and back again) Colonization of land involved use of lungs modification of jointed fins to become limbs modification of the skin (keratin scales, hair, feathers in reptiles) internal fertilization in reptiles shelled eggs with membranes to protect young in reptiles Aquatic only
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Amphibians require moist environments lose water rapidly through skin early stages often require water
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Reptiles—keratin scales in the skin, internal fertilization, and the amniotic egg. Fish scales are homologous to teeth (both dermal structures), but not to reptile scales. Reptile scales are homologous to mammal hair and bird feathers (epidermal structures).
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The extra- embryonic membranes are homologous to the mammalian placenta.
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• more on primates see about 9 th • more on birds fig.33.18 Archeaopteryx at 147 mya And 30 modern orders at K-T rapid diversification
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THE ARGUMENT For HOMOLOGY THE ARGUMENT For HOMOLOGY
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Carolina parakeet Carolina parakeet From Ohio to Gulf of From Ohio to Gulf of Mexico; only N. Mexico; only N. American parrot American parrot Last bird died in 1918 Last bird died in 1918 Killed as agricultural Killed as agricultural pests and for ladies pests and for ladies ’ hats hats Fed on cockleburs, Fed on cockleburs, which have ironically which have ironically become a major become a major agricultural pest agricultural pest Passenger pigeon Passenger pigeon during migration, flocks a during migration, flocks a mile wide and 300 mile wide and 300 miles miles long, taking several days long, taking several days
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course BIOLOGY BIS 2C taught by Professor Doyle during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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BIS%2C%20Lecture%2038%20Fall%202010 - Fall 2010 Lecture 38....

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