Theory Exam II

Theory Exam II - COMM 3210 Human Communication Theory Study Guide Exam 2 Exam Date General How does each of these traditions(semiotics cybernetics

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COMM 3210 Human Communication Theory Study Guide – Exam 2 Exam Date – October 28, 2010 General How does each of these traditions (semiotics, cybernetics, phenomenology) define communication? How does each tradition frame communication problems? How do the theorists we have read relate to their respective traditions? What are the major differences among these traditions, and among theorists within each tradition? Semotic Tradition : Peirce – What is a sign? What tradition is Peirce associated with? How would he define communication? founder of modern semiotic theory founder of American pragmatist philosophy (the meaning of a thing is its practical consequences) What is the focus of Peirce’s theory? how signs function in the mind meaning is a constantly changing thought process What are the three states of mind? How does this process relate to signs? Feeling: simple awareness of something; ex: walking through my house in darkness Reaction: sense of acting and being acted upon; ex: I bump into something; involves 2 feelings Thought: discovering a rule that connects action and reaction; ex: I bumped into this chair in the dark because my daughter is home and moved it; involves 3 feelings In this thought process, the bump becomes a SIGN that my daughter is home Something is a sign when we have a mediatory interest in it, in so far as it conveys to a mind an idea about a thing What are the three interests one can take in a thing? Which interest regards the thing as a sign? Why? What are the three components of a sign (triadic composition)? Examples? o Physical form: seeing smoke, hearing “banana” o A concept in someone’s mind: association of smoke and fire; concept of a banana o An object or situation to which the sign refers: a particular fire; a particular banana What are the three kinds of signs? Think of examples for each. How are the three kinds different? How do they work together in communication? Why can the same physical object or event (signifier) be more than one kind of sign? Example?
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Icon: the signifier is perceived as RESEMBLING or imitating the signified—e.g. a portrait, a scale model, onomatopoeia, metaphors, sound effects, imitative gestures. Index: the signifier is DIRECTLY CONNCTED (physically or causally) to the signified—e.g. ‘natural signs’ (smoke, thunder, footprints, medical symptoms), measuring instruments (thermometer, clock), ‘signals’ (a knock on a door, a phone ringing), ‘pointers’ (a pointing ‘index’ finger, a directional signpost) Symbol: the signifier is ARBITRARY or purely CONVENTIONAL—e.g. words, alphabetic letters, numbers, Morse code, traffic lights, national flags, some gestures (peace sign) What does it mean to say that symbols grow?
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course COMM 3300 taught by Professor Vogelaar,a during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

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Theory Exam II - COMM 3210 Human Communication Theory Study Guide Exam 2 Exam Date General How does each of these traditions(semiotics cybernetics

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